Past Programmes

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In Vietnam, $262 million per year of economic loss results from poor sanitation, a figure which includes costs of health care, productivity loss and premature death.  In Oct 2010, GIFT collaborated with International Development Enterprises (IDE) to write a plan for the production and sales of low-cost household hand washing devices in rural Vietnam. This was part of the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP) behaviour change initiative to promote handwashing with soap as a way to improve health and hygiene. During the field visit, participants worked closely with the Vietnam Women’s Union (WU), one of the largest and most influential government mass organisations in Vietnam. The programme research covers the current hygiene and sanitation conditions in rural Vietnam, the socio-economic importance of handwashing and why it is crucial for rural communities in developing countries to incorporate this as part of a healthy lifestyle.

The business plan proposed a social venture whereby members of the Women’s Union are involved in distributing the handwashing devices to rural families.  For a visual overview of the field visit please see the photo story and for a comprehensive review of the entire programme please refer to the round up.   If you have questions regarding any aspect of this programme please contact Eric Stryson on estryson@global-inst.com.

The project is still ongoing through the joint efforts of Unilever Vietnam, IDE and WSP. The three parties have pledged to financially support the pilot phase of the product launch while the flagship product design schematics are being finalised by IDEO, an award-winning global design firm. Please click here for project update.

 


    www.ideorg.org                                   www.wsp.org

 
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GIFT designed and facilitated part of the 2010 Global Leaders Module (GLM), a component of the annual Senior Management Programme at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. Participants worked with Hydrologic, a spin-off social enterprise set up by International Development Enterprises (IDE) to provide a rural Cambodians with a cheap low-tech device which provides a source of clean drinking water. The United Nations (UN) estimates that 1.8 million children around the world die each year as a result of diarrhoea, a disease partly caused by contaminated water. This issue is of utmost priority in poverty-stricken Cambodia, where years of civil war left much of the country’s infrastructure in ruins. The briefing note explains Cambodia’s access to clean drinking water, along with an analysis of various household water treatment solutions.

The business plan proposed a revamp of the NGO-centric distribution system for the Hydrologic Ceramic Water Purifier into a for-profit model that stresses the education of rural Cambodians. For a visual overview of the programme please see the photo story and please refer to the round-up for a comprehensive review of the field-trip.  If you have any questions regarding any aspect of this programme please contact Eric Stryson on estryson@global-inst.com.

 


   www.ideorg.org                             www.hydrologichealth.com

 
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There is an increasingly important need to deliver quality care services to the ageing population in China. In part due to the one-child policy and pension schemes in different parts of China, many elderly do not have the financial capabilities to acquire the services they sorely need. The partner for this programme was Hetong Association, one of China’s leading elderly homes and services provider. The participants were tasked with producing strategic recommendations for Hetong’s expansion plans and transition from a non-profit organisation into a social enterprise. Our pre-programme research it includes an overview of the issues faced by Chinese elderly and the state of elderly care in China. In addition it includes information on Hetong’s operations and history, including their involvement in the aftermath of the Sichuan Earthquake of 2008.

The business plan proposed the setup of a new commercial company, Hetong China Holdings (HCH), and to start a new showcase elderly care facility in Shenzhen. For a visual overview of the programme please see the photo story and please refer to the round-up for a comprehensive review of the field-trip.

If you have any questions regarding any aspect of this programme please contact Eric Stryson on estryson@global-inst.com.

 

  www.hetong.org.cn

 
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Integrated community development plan for NIKP Sangatta

East Kalimantan, Indonesia 8 March – 20 April 2010

GIFT launched the inaugural Integrated Leadership Programme (ILP) in partnership with IMC Group in Singapore and East West Learning Enterprises. Based on the YLP methodology, this programme brought 25 managers from around the company’s various business units to perform a needs assessment and propose an Integrated Community Development Plan for one of the investments within IMC Plantations in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Participants had the rare opportunity to tackle real-world socio-economic development issues within the complex environment of an oil palm plantation and put the company philosophy of Active Citizenship into practice. This programme is an example of the great potential to use the dynamism and experience of internal resources to provide a fresh perspective on challenges and opportunities facing the company and achieve a robust executive learning experience in the process.

As the project is internal to IMC, the briefing note and business plan are not available to the public. However, please watch the video to have a brief experience of the ILP.

 


                        
www.imcgroup.info  

 
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In Dec 2009, GIFT participants collaborated with the Aceh Partnership for Economic Development (APED) to write a plan for a new model cocoa processing and trading company which would improve livelihoods for smallholder farmers and promote economic recovery after the tsunami of 2004.  APED was a partnership between the UNDP and the local government in Aceh and had also done work in the coffee and rubber sectors. Due to a lack of education in proper cultivation and harvesting techniques as well as a lack of access to market data, cocoa farmers were regularly underpaid for their crops by collectors. They also produced yields far below their potential in both quantity and quality and had no standardized processing techniques which were necessary for them to move up in the value chain for cocoa products. As a result Aceh lagged far behind other Indonesian provinces in the production of this important cash crop.

Participants proposed a new model for cocoa farmers to increase their income through a standardized system of collection and processing and a company structure which aligned the interests of all local stakeholders involved. For a visual overview of the field visit please see the photo story and for a comprehensive review of the site visit please see the round up.

 

     www.undp.org

 
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In this tailored programme for American International Assurance (AIA), participants partnered with Half the Sky Foundation (HTS), a non-profit organisation created to enrich the lives of orphans living in China’s social welfare institutions. According to government statistics there are currently 573,000 orphans in China, with fewer than 15 per cent living under government care. Many of them were abandoned because of deceased parents, personal disability or special medical conditions, and some were handed over to governmental care simply because they were girls. The participants reviewed the specific funding needs of the Xian orphanage and HTS’s future plans to incorporate social entrepreneurism into its programmes. In addition to details of the Xian project, the programme research looks into the social and economic reasons for the large number of orphans in China.

The business plan proposed a strategic plan for enhancing the health and well-being of orphan children at Xian Children’s Welfare Institute. For a visual overview of the programme please see the photo story.

 

  www.halfthesky.org